Category Beyond Bethel

Adelphia College ca. 1905

When Bethel Had a Sibling

In 1910 just over 350,000 Americans (not quite 3% of the total population) were enrolled in a total of 951 institutions of higher learning; by 1920, enrollment neared 600,000 (almost 5% of population) and there were over a thousand colleges, universities, law schools, business schools, medical and dental schools, normal schools, seminaries, and other such […]

Worship service on the U.S.S. South Dakota, June 1944

“We have among us very many Christian softies…”

In his posts on the Vietnam War, Fletcher has noted that Bethel-educated chaplains like Kenneth Carlson received a great deal of publicity from the Baptist General Conference. In the pages of the BGC’s chief publication, The Standard, these uniformed pastors were both “the primary mediators of the war to Conference laity” and “front-line soldiers in the global struggle against atheistic communism.” […]

Conscientious objectors in November 1918

Christians at War: A Pacifist Turn?

During and after the First World War, Bethel Academy principal A.J. Wingblade made a concerted effort to keep a full list of all those associated with Bethel who had served as soldiers, sailors, or nurses during the war. As many as could be reached were invited back to campus for a special reception on December 1919, where they […]

"Kid in Upper 4" cover of the Nov 1943 Bethel Bulletin

“The Kid in Upper 4”: Further Thoughts on Bethel Fundraising during WWII

Earlier this month I noted how “as the [Second World] war went on, ‘Loyalty’ began to be used in Bethel publications in such a way that loyalty to country and loyalty to God were put in service of loyalty to Bethel, and its desire for better facilities.” Starting in late 1942, the prewar practice of designating February […]

Bethel yearbook dedicated to the memory of Olivia Johnson

The “Spanish Flu”

One of the more curious sections of Windows of Memory, the 1961 memoir by Henry Wingblade (Bethel president from 1941-1954, after having taught at the Academy and Junior College for many years), is his chapter on Bethel and world missions (no. 25). Instead of simply telling the stories of five Bethel alumni who entered the missions field, […]

The Professoriate Turns: Evangelical Antiwar Dissent at Calvin College

A few weeks ago I looked broadly at the Evangelical left and Vietnam, focusing particularly on Jim Wallis and the Post Americans. Of course, not all evangelicals who ended up opposing the war would have described themselves as leftists, nor would they have been comfortable with the extent to which the Post Americans critiqued American […]

Charles Lindbergh, Sr. and Charles Lindbergh, Jr. in 1917

“A Folk Divided”: Swedish-Americans and WWI

The Swedes have always been considered desirable additions to American citizenry, perhaps for the reason that they leave a less noticeable trace in the fabric of our society than any other non-English-speaking stock. Their spirit, if not their costume and language, is American before they bid farewell to their friends at home. While their love […]

"Remember! The flag of liberty" - 1918 propaganda aimed at recent immigrants

“100 Percentism”: Nativism in WWI America

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism…. The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or […]

Nursing cadets being sworn in at the University of Minnesota, 1944

WWII on Twin Cities Campuses

A couple weeks ago I looked at how some of Bethel’s neighboring colleges and universities in the Twin Cities experienced the First World War. Today I’ll turn to the Second World War, again pulling some tidbits from Merrill Jarchow’s history of private colleges in Minnesota but here broadening a bit to see how the Twin Cities’ […]

Gavrilo Princip captured, moments after shooting Franz and Sophie Ferdinand

Two Shots

When this post goes live, it will have been exactly one hundred years since Gavrilo Princip fired two shots into a 1911 model Gräf & Stift touring car, killing Archduke and heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie. Princip, who was not quite a month shy of his twenty-first birthday at […]